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SOCIAL ANIMAL

SOCIALIZE!

Welcome to The Definitive Web 2:0 REsource page

REVOLUTION, NOW.
Welcome to TDW20RP!
AKA The Definitive Web 2.0 Resource Page

Pag 01 Here you are The Index
And some announces and slogans and propaganda
Pa
g 02 HUGE web 2.0 streams of RSS from the best Blogs and News sources  around for you Info Addicted
Pag 03 some nice pages
  and bookmarks
Pag 04 some cool 2.0 apps to play

                                        (06-20-2006 added definitiveweb20 wiki (http://www.wetpaint.com/) Share, Now and Gabbly Chat  (http://www.Gabbly.com): Socialize, now!
new Pag 05 accessibility resources

YOU

getalife
           and share it

FOLK

YOU HAVE TO tag  tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag ta tag tag tag tag tag tag  tag tag tag tag tag tag tag  tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag tag, you know that the word is tag, but your mind didn't stop to try to find a sense in tag. tag tag

GROW

The latest numbers are in from comScore on select social networking and media sites. 


Traffic in May, 2006 broke down like this (in unique visitors, rounded to the nearest million):


1.  MySpace—51 million
2.  Classmates.com sites—15 million
3.  Facebook—14 million
4.  YouTube—13 million
5.  MSN Spaces—10 million
6.  Xanga—7 million
7.  Flickr—5 million
8.  Yahoo 360—5 million


Just last February, comScore reported only 37 million visitors for MySpace. 

And YouTube grew 92 percent in the month of May alone (It's traffic in April was 6.6 million). 

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"Web 1.0 was commerce.
Web 2.0 is people,"

Ross Mayfield - WEB 2.0 Conference.

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http://getahead.ltd.uk/blog/joe/2006/03/09/1141929483908.html

3 Myths of Ajax and Accessibility
I've seen quite a few ideas and bits of policy writing about accessiblity that could probably do with some updating. These are the 3 most common.


Myth 1. Accessibility is a single issue

One of the problems with accessibility as a single concept is that it lumps together issues that are sometimes fairly unrelated. Blind people have different accessibility requirements from partially sighted people, or those with motor impairment. People with slow modems need different things from those on corporate networks with strict security. We need to think about separate requirements, ... separately.


Myth 2. All accessibility issues must be fixed

Our attitudes to these disabilities should also vary between accessibility issues. We can't ignore blind people from a moral or legal standpoint. Do we ignore someone that really likes his or her copy of Netscape 3 and doesn't want to upgrade? Now it's a business decision, not a moral or legal one. There are many issues like text-mode browsers and small screens that accessibility books handle. We don't always need to address them all.


Myth 3. Javascript won't work with screen readers

Screen readers mostly work by plugging into IE or Firefox and reading what's on the screen. It doesn't matter how it got there. More advanced ones actually let you fire off onmouseover and onclick events using the keyboard and will inform the listener that there is an action worth considering. That's more feedback than sighted users get sometimes. Screen readers do have a problem with content that's generated at a point on the screen that has already been read. This is where Ajax may have the biggest issue with accessibilty, and something that we need to be aware of.


It's great to have got DWR 1.1 out of the door (check the detailed release notes and download it). One of my focuses for DWR 2.0 is making it easy to create websites that interact with screen readers to solve the problem of generated content.

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