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Where do I start?

The first step is always prayer! The Lord already knows your future and if you allow him to guide you He will show you the path. Jeremiah 29:11-13 (New International Version) 11 For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. 12 Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. 13 You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.

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Tina San Roman

 


Tina San Roman

School Counselor/Student Activity Coordinator

tsanroman@fbauc.com

 

     Tina San Roman currently serves as the School Counselor and Student Activity Coordinator of First Baptist Academy. She has been with FBA since 2008 serving as a 4th grade teacher, a middle school Math and Science teacher, and parent volunteer.

     Mrs. San Roman attended the University of Texas at Austin for her Bachelor and Master of Science in Social Work degrees. After working with abused and neglected children, she decided to pursue her teaching certificate where she could be a positive influence on many children during their school day.  Her passion to serve the Lord led her to a career as a Christian educator in order to  help children find their true identity and worth through Christ Jesus.

   Tina is married to Luis and has four children, Blake, Bethany, Bryton and Bevin.   Three of these are First Baptist Academy students.   Mrs. San Roman believes that it is no mistake that God led her to First Baptist Academy. Her life verse which has led her through many of life’s trials is our school verse: Isaiah 40:31 “but those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength.They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.”

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First Baptist Academy

School Profile

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School Profile

FIRST BAPTIST ACADEMY “Educating Students for Time and Eternity” HISTORY First Baptist Church founded its Christian day school in 1979 by establishing a first grade which soon expanded through the eighth grade. Today, the Academy ministers to over 400 students from 3 years of age through twelfth grade. FBA Mission: Educate students for time & eternity by presenting God’s truth in all areas of education and character development. FBA Vision: Teach the Way, Train in Truth, Live the Life FBA Philosophy: Kingdom Education with a Biblical Worldview FBA Goal: Honor/Glorify God (dominion/Gen1:28); Love (Mt 22:37-39); Go (Mt 28:18-20) ACCREDITATION Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) Texas Private School Accreditation Commission (TEPSAC) MEMBERSHIPS Texas Association of Private and Parochial Schools (TAPPS) National Junior Honor Society National Honor Society Christian Athletic League of San Antonio (CALSA) ACADEMIC DISTINCTIONS Honors Courses— English I - IV, World History, US History, Biology, Anatomy & Physiology, Algebra, Geometry, Pre-Calculus, Calculus Dual Credit offerings- Eligible students can earn up to 30 tuition free college credits during high school through St. Philips College. Classes for English Composition, British Literature, US History, and Digital Imaging are taught by FBA teachers who are also adjunct professors for St. Philips. Online classes such as College Algebra, Pre-Calculus, Sociology, Psychology, …are also available. GPA/Overall Academic Averages A student’s overall academic average and grade point average is calculated based upon semester grades in all courses. A = 90-100+ (4.0+), B = 80-89 (3.0 - 3.99), C = 70-79 (2.0 - 2.99), F = 0—69 (0 -1.99) CLASS RANK FBA is selective in our admission/academic requirements and our classes are relatively small. Therefore, due to the demand for exceptional performance of all students, ranking is only reported for the top 10% of each class. Valedictorian & Salutatorian are chosen based on overall numeric average, advanced coursework, servitude, and Christian character. Class Size The average class size is 19 students with a range from 14 to 24 students. SCHOLARSHIPS AND COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE 96% of FBA graduates attend college. Annually, FBA students are offered up to $1,000,000 in scholarships and grants including full ride allotments. Students were also offered acceptance into the following Universities & Colleges: Abilene Christian, Alamo Colleges, Baylor , East Texas Baptist, Howard Payne, Letourneau, Houston Baptist, St. Edwards, St. Mary’s, Schreiner, Texas A & M, Texas Lutheran, Texas State, Texas Tech, University of Incarnate Word, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, University of Texas at Austin & San Antonio, Arizona State, Central Christian of Kansas, Kansas State, Florida State, Tabor College - Kansas, Barclay College - Kansas, Embry-Riddle – Arizona, Savannah College of Art & Design - Georgia, College for Creative Studies-Michigan, Hillsong International Leadership College – Australia,... SCHOOL CALENDAR First Baptist Academy school year is divided into two semesters with comprehensive examinations in core subjects at the end of each term. Students attend class on an eight period day from 8:10 AM until 3:35 PM. GRADING/CREDITS Two semester courses (full year courses) earn 1.0 credit Two semester courses that meet 2-3 days a week earn .50 credit One semester courses earn a .50 credit. GPA is based upon a 4.0 scale and is unweighted High School courses are graded on a 0 – 100 point numeric scale. Dual Credit High School courses can earn up to a grade of 110 due to their complexity. Letter grades are not used at First Baptist Academy in grades 7—12. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Student entering high school before 2014-2015: Recommended/Distinguished Diploma Program Bible 4.0 History 4.0 English 4.0 Mathematics 4.0 Science 4.0 Foreign Language 2.0—3.0 Physical Education 1.0 Fine Arts 1.0 Electives 1.0 Total 25.0—26.0 Student entering high school after 2014-2015 and those before by choice: Foundation Diploma Program with Multidisciplinary Endorsement English 4.0 Bible 4.0 History 4.0 Mathematics 4.0 Science 4.0 Foreign Language 2.0—3.0 Physical Education 1.0 Fine Arts 1.0 Electives 1.0 Total 25.0—26.0 STEM Endorsement 4x4 + Extra Math Credits Fine Arts Endorsement 4 Credits in Fine Arts National Merit Recognition Class of 2008 National Hispanic Scholar Class of 2013 National Merit Qualifier Texas Association of Private & Parochial Schools (TAPPS) Recognitions: 2A State Champion: Choir, Band, Track 2A District Champion: Boys Basketball 1A State Champion: Choir, Band, Volleyball, Girls Basketball , Soccer 1A Area Champion: Volleyball, Boys Basketball, Girls Basketball 1A District Champion: Girls Basketball What distinguishes the academy from other college preparatory schools? The FBA family’s heart is to disciple and prepare students for the great commission: to Go in Jesus through dominion/servant leadership (Gen 1:28) and share the Love of Jesus (Mt 22:37-39; 28:18-20) for time and eternity.

Administration

Christine Povolish Administrator Bob Paton Upper School Principal Rodney Rodriguez Athletic Director Tina San Roman School Counselor Carol Cash Curriculum Coordinator Venita Leader Registrar Christina Hill Office Manager Kimberly Witt Bookkeeper Carrie Kilwy Lunchroom Coordinator 1401 Pat Booker Rd. Universal City, Texas 78148 Phone: 210-658-5331 Fax: 210-658-7024 E-mail: administrator@fbauc.com Webpage: www.fbauc.com

Graduation

Bookmarks

Graduation links

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FBA Course Plan

8th grade

Algebra 1


 9th grade

Biology Honors

Bible 1

Geometry Honors

Spanish I

Geography

English I Honors

Band/Choir/Computer Graphics/ Study Hall

P.E./Health

 

10th Grade

P.E./Athletics/Theater/Creative Writing/Study Hall

Bible 2

Algebra II Honors

Spanish II

Chemistry

English II Honors

World History Honors

Band/Choir/Computer Graphics/ Study Hall

P.E./Athletics/Theater/Creative Writing/Study Hall

 

11th Grade

Bible 3

Pre-Calculus Honors

Spanish III

Physics

English III Honors/English Dual Credit

United States History Honors/ US History Dual Credit

Band/Choir/Computer Graphics/ Study Hall

P.E./Athletics/Theater/Creative Writing/Study Hall

 

12th Grade

Bible 4

Calculus Honors (optional)/Math Dual Credit online (optional)

Anatomy/Physiology Honors

English IV Honors/English Dual Credit

Government and Economics

Band/Choir/Computer Graphics/ Study Hall/No Class

P.E./Athletics/Theater/Creative Writing/Study Hall/No Class

Senior Advisory

 

FBA Graduation Requirements

GRADUATION  REQUIREMENTS
FBA is a college preparatory school.  Students are required to take be on a college prep (4 of the 4 core subjects) or advanced (4 of the 4 core plus 3 foreign languages) program of study.

Student entering high school before 2014-2015:
Recommended/Distinguished Diploma Program

Bible 4.0
History 4.0
English 4.0
Mathematics 4.0
Science 4.0
Foreign Language 2.0—3.0
Physical Education 1.0
Fine Arts 1.0
Electives 1.0
Total 25.0—26.0

Student entering high school after 2014-2015 and those before by choice:
Foundation Diploma Program with Multidisciplinary Endorsement and
Distinguished Level of Achievement
English 4.0
Bible 4.0
History 4.0
Mathematics 4.0
Science 4.0
Foreign Language 2.0—3.0
Physical Education 1.0
Fine Arts 1.0
Electives 1.0
Total 25.0—26.0
STEM Endorsement with Extra Math Credit
Fine Arts Endorsement with 4 Credits in Fine Arts


FBA Endorsements

Endorsements

Endorsements consist of a related series of courses that are grouped
together by interest or skill set. They provide students with in-depth knowledge of a subject area.
Students must select an endorsement* in the ninth grade. Districts and charters are not required
to offer all endorsements. If only one endorsement is offered, it must be multidisciplinary studies.
Students earn an endorsement by completing the curriculum requirements for the endorsement,
including 4th credit of math and science and 2 additional elective credits.

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM):

• Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses related to STEM
• Computer Science
• Mathematics
• Science
• Combination of no more than two of the categories listed above

 Arts and Humanities
(one of the following):

• 2 levels each in two languages other than English (LOTE
• Social Studies
• 4 levels in the same LOTE
• Courses from one or two areas (music, theater, art, dance) in fine arts
• English electives not included in Business and Industry

 Multidisciplinary Studies (one of the following)
• 4 advanced courses from other endorsement areas
• 4 credits in each foundation subject area, including English IV and chemistry and/or physics
• 4 credits in Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or dual credit selected
from English, mathematics, science, social studies, economics, LOTE or ne arts

Rich text note

Distinguished Level of Achievement - Benefits

What it is
A high level of academic achievement earned by going beyond the Foundation High School
Program. It requires a total of 26 course credits, including Algebra II, a fourth science credit
and an endorsement. A student must earn this designation to be eligible for Top 10 percent
automatic admission to a Texas public university.

Choices determine options
Most of the very best jobs available now and in the future require education
and training beyond a high school diploma. Whether you intend to pursue a high-demand,
industry workforce credential from a community or technical
college or a traditional four-year degree from a university, the choices made
in high school will determine your future options.
To best prepare yourself now for the transition to post-high school education
or quality workforce training, choosing and taking the right classes is essential.
The Distinguished Level of Achievement will ensure the best preparation for
your future.

Why it matters — Benefits
The Distinguished Level of Achievement opens a world of educational and employment
opportunities for you beyond high school. The Distinguished Level of Achievement will:
• Allow you to compete for Top 10% automatic admissions eligibility at any Texas public university;
• Position you among those rest in line for a TEXAS Grant* to help pay for university tuition and fees;
• Ensure you are a more competitive applicant at the most selective colleges and universities.

What it means

The Distinguished Level of Achievement requires more math and more science than the
Foundation High School Program. The Distinguished Level of Achievement requires:
• A total of four credits in math, including Algebra II;
• A total of four credits in science; and
• Successful completion of an endorsement in your area of interest.

Advantages
• Opportunity to earn an endorsement in an area of interest
• More college and university options
• More nancial aid options
• Better preparation for college-level coursework at community/technical colleges and universities
• Opportunity for immediate enrollment in classes related to your chosen eld of study
• Strong foundation to successfully complete an industry workforce credential or college degree


Texas Education Agency Graduation Toolkit

FBA Performance Acknowledgments

Performance Acknowledgments

Students may earn an additional acknowledgment on their diploma because of outstanding
performance in areas such as dual credit courses, PSAT,  SAT, or ACT exams.

Dual Credit:  12 Credit hours completed with a 3.0 Average
PSAT:  Commended Status
SAT:  1250+ in Critical Reading and Math
ACT:   28+ Composite

Dual Credit

Bookmarks

Dual Credit Links

Plain sticky notes

Dual Credit Information

First Baptist Academy offers dual credit courses to 10th,11th, and 12th grade students. Eligible students will earn college credit and high school credit concurrently. Up to 30 college credits may be earned (sophomores 6, juniors 12, & seniors 12). FBA coordinates with St. Philip’s College to offer several dual credit course options to include: College Course High School Course equivalent ENGL 1301 – English Composition I 11th grade English 3 – 1st Semester ENGL 1302 - English Composition II 11th grade English 3 – 2nd Semester HIST 1301 - US History I 11th grade US History – 1st Semester HIST 1302 – US History II 11th grade US History – 2nd Semester ENGL 2322 (ENGL 1302 prereq) British Lit I 12th grade English 4 – 1st Semester ENGL 2323 (ENGL 1302 prereq) British Lit II 12th grade English 4 – 2nd Semester Any Online course offered by St. Philip's College English, History, and Digital Imaging courses are taught by FBA faculty who are adjunct professors for St. Philips. Math is an online course with an FBA faculty facilitator to help students. Other courses are available online for independent study or on the St. Philip's campus after school for students over the age of 16. ELIGIBILITY/ENROLLMENT INSTRUCTIONS AND DEADLINES: • Eligibility and Enrollment begins in the Spring of the Sophomore year. • Apply to St Philips - late January: Students will be given information and a “walk-thru” of the online application process on ApplyTexas.com. The application must be complete before taking assessment test. Students will be assigned a banner ID number which is their student id number once their application has been processed. • Dual Credit Consent forms due before taking assessment test and must be completed by student, parent and school counselor. Completed packets will be sent to St. Phillips by school counselor. • Go FAARR and *Test Module – Students will log onto their ACES account to take these online college and test preparation module. These must be completed before taking the assessment test. • *Assessment Test- late February Counselor will register students for test and provide transportation for first sitting. The counselor will provide students with the date and they will need to go online to pay. St. Philips will consider eligibility based upon high school transcripts, completion of application, dual credit consent form and Assessment Test scores. First Baptist Academy will consider eligibility based upon previous high school academic performance. Students will receive a 10 point increase in their FBA course grade for the weighted component of Dual Credit courses. Students must maintain a passing St. Philips grade of 70 and a FBA grade of 80 (after 10 points is added) in any Dual Credit course to be eligible to continue in the program. Continuation in the Dual Credit program will be assessed at the end of each semester. ASSESSMENT TESTING – TSI ASSESSMENT • Test Date - late February-March at 9:00am at Northeast Lakeview College. Transportation from FBA will be provided and will be leaving campus at 8:30am. • Materials needed: Picture ID, Social Security Number, Banner ID • Preparation assistance: Test Modules taken through ACES and TSI booklet available from counselor or http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/accuplacer/accuplacer-texas-success-initiative-assessment-student-brochure.pdf • Passing Scores: English 1301: Writing 340+ and Essay 4, or any score with Essay 5 and Reading 351+ History 1301: Writing 340+ and Essay 4, or any score with Essay 5 and Reading 351+ Math1414: TSI Math 350 and Reading or qualifying SAT/ACT exempt scores of SAT CR+Math of 1070+ or ACT Composite 23+ Some classes to not require a minimum score but testing still must be completed. Students who do not get passing scores will be able to retake the failed portion before June 1st and still qualify for the program. **Please note, not all students qualify for dual credit courses or choose to participate in the program. The academic program here at FBA is strong and our past graduates who choose to attend college have had wonderful acceptance responses and scholarship offers, with and without participating in the dual credit program. Please view our school profile for more information.

Dual Credit Checklist

[ ] Apply to St Philips through www.ApplyTexas.com [ ] Return Dual Credit Consent forms to Mrs. San Roman [ ] Create ACES account at www.alamo.edu/spc [ ] Complete Go FAARR module within ACES account [ ] Complete Test Prep Modules (if not TSI Exempt) within ACES account [ ] Inform Mrs. San Roman that you have completed Test Prep Modules by giving her a printed screen shot of your ACES scores or completed task list [ ] Mrs. San Roman will inform you of the date for the TSI Assessment [ ] Your account will be billed the $32.00 test fee. [ ] Take TSI Assessment (materials needed: Picture ID, Banner ID, Payment Receipt) • Qualifying Scores: English 1301: Writing 340+ and Essay 4, or any score with Essay 5; Reading 351+ History 1301: Writing 340+ and Essay 4, or any score with Essay 5; Reading 351+ Math1414: TSI Math 350+ and Reading or qualifying SAT/ACT exempt [ ] Retake portions of TSI Assessment if necessary to get qualifying scores [ ] Give copy of scores to Mrs. San Roman

College/Career Interests

Bookmarks

Career Interest Links

College Search

Job Search

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An Overview of the College Admissions Process

AN OVERVIEW OF THE PROCESS 1. Develop a “College Characteristics” list and a “Personal Interest” list. • Assess personal attributes and goals (see self-assessment on next page) • Develop a list of questions related to your needs, e.g., a learning style, specialty programs. • Research career interests and educational requirements 2. Study college guides or handbooks or surf the Web to learn about colleges. 3. Compile a list of preferred schools. Do not limit yourself to one school. 4. Contact those institutions for additional information and applications. Attend college and career fairs. 5. Maintain separate files on each college or university and store them in a safe place. 6. Visit colleges. Stay overnight. Attend classes. 7. Talk with current students or alumni for the “student” perspective on a particular school. 8. Plan and prepare for taking necessary tests (SAT, ACT, ASVAB…) 9. Research scholarship opportunities and complete financial aid forms (FAFSA). 10. Begin completing applications as they become available in September. Note all deadlines (housing, scholarship, financial aid, early action, early decision, etc.). 11. Check with the institutions or on-line application status a few weeks after you send your application to confirm receipt of your documents. Ask if you need to do anything else to complete your application.

What will be a good fit for me?

A thorough self-assessment will help you determine what is the best college and career choice for you. I. Start by carefully reviewing your current High School transcript. (Your Guidance Counselor can provide you with a current transcript.) • Does my transcript accurately reflect my coursework taken? With your Guidance Counselor, carefully check that all classes taken are accounted for and that you are meeting all graduation requirements. • What is my GPA (grade point average)? GPA can be a determinate for entry into some schools. • What subjects did I excel in? Subjects you did well are a reflection your personal interests and talents. Keep these in mind when looking at career choices. II. Take a look at the School Profile. The School Profile is included with every transcript you request to be sent out. It contains important information about First Baptist Academy (our Accreditation, grading systems, ranking policies, graduation requirements, etc…). These are items that will be of interest to college admissions departments where you will be applying. III. Complete an Activities Inventory Worksheet and College Resume’. Colleges want to see a diversity of activity that students have participated in throughout high school. Completing the Activities Inventory Worksheet (page11) will help you evaluate your high school accomplishments and will be used to create a college resume’ (page12). IV. Complete Self-Assessment In order to find colleges that will fit your needs and interests, you must be clear about what those needs really are V. Explore Careers Research current employment trends and what jobs are available. Keep up with current events and employment speculations. Look into salary levels paid and educational requirements for jobs that interest you

College Needs Self-Assessment

In order to find colleges that will fit your needs and interests, you must be clear about what those needs really are. Complete the following inventory by evaluating each statment as Yes (Y), No (N), or Unimportant (U). 1. I need to be close to home (easily accessible by plane or car). Y N U 2. I need to be in an environment where I will feel like part of a community. Y N U 3. I need to be in a location where I can explore many interests off campus. Y N U 4. The climate where the school is located is an important factor to me. Y N U 5. I want to go to a college attended by many of my friends from high school. Y N U 6. I want the students to be like me--similar in religious background, political outlook, part of the country, and values. Y N U 7. I want to know my professors and have them available to me. Y N U 8. I need specific facilities – laboratories, studio space, etc. Y N U 9. I want anonymity in college – a chance to “get lost.” Y N U 10. I want to be actively involved in the life of the campus. Y N U 11. I want the majority of students to live on campus, not commute. Y N U 12. I would like to belong to a sorority/fraternity. Y N U 13. I want a “rah-rah” atmosphere on campus. Y N U 14. I would like to participate in intercollegiate athletics. Y N U 15. I want the flexibility to experiment in the curriculum and change majors Y N U 16. I know what I want to study. Y N U 17. I want professors who are primarily teachers (not researchers) who care about teaching me. Y N U 18. I need structured curriculum that will be clearly defined for me as far as core requirements, requirements in my major and electives. Y N U 19. I need a challenging academic environment where most of the students are at my ability level or higher. Y N U 20. I need to please myself in making the decision about college more than I need to please others –- family, friends, classmates, or teachers. Y N U

Types of Schools

Start your college search by recognizing the many different types of colleges. Students usually do not consider this before submitting their applications. Although a majority of students go to a four-year college or university, you may want to consider other alternatives. UNIVERSITIES offer a broad range of both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. They can vary considerably in size and in the diversity of the programs they offer, but are generally larger than other types of colleges. They typically offer more majors and have more research facilities than do other colleges. COLLEGES are divided by departments and usually offer one or two degrees (Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science) in many academic disciplines. This would include a major in departments such as math, English, literature, science, foreign language, politics, history, or electrical engineering. There are various types of colleges (liberal arts, technological, military, education). They generally have smaller enrollments than most universities and offer fewer degrees. Most do not offer PhD programs but may offer graduate degrees. JUNIOR OR COMMUNITY COLLEGES award associate degrees at the completion of two years of full- time study. They frequently offer technical programs of study that prepare students for immediate entry into the job market. In addition, many offer general educational programs that are the equivalent of the first two years of a bachelor’s degree program. These are called transfer programs; upon completion, students may enter bachelor’s degree programs at the third-year level. The majority of two-year public colleges have open admission policies, although some individual programs, like nursing, may be selective. TECHNICAL SCHOOLS specialize in one or more of the branches of engineering technology: aeronautics; air conditioning, heating and refrigeration; automotive diesel and steam technologies; construction; chemical technology; electronics; mechanics and metallurgy; tool designing; computer technology; and others. VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS offer additional post-graduate training in a large number of fields. Courses run from a few weeks to several years. Business and secretarial schools offer typing, stenography, bookkeeping, data processing, and other business related courses. At other schools, you can learn acting, police work, dressmaking, court reporting, cosmetology, upholstering, welding and other specialized careers. MILITARY SCHOOLS Any student who is interested in attending a United States military academy can find information at www.usma.edu . For a Congressional Nomination you should contact Congressman Lamar Smith’s office as soon as possible. You will find a link on http://lamarsmith.house.gov. There is an October deadline to complete the application process for admission to the academy classes that will begin next summer. Staff Assistant Anne Overby in Congressman Smith’s Kerrville office is available to assist you. If you have any questions, she can be reached at 830-896-0154 or via email at anne.overby@mail.house.gov. Selection is based on SAT/ACT scores, class ranking, grade point average, extracurricular activities, leadership potential and motivation. MILITARY ACADEMIES Many young men and women wish to attend one of the service academies to serve their country as a military officer. The screening process is a rigorous one and begins early. Some senators have a November 1st deadline. If you are interested, you need to see your counselor in the spring of your junior year to begin the necessary testing and paper work. The following addresses are provided for your information Army Director of Admissions United States Military Academy 606 Thayer Road West Point, New York 10996-1797 1-800-822-2769 http://www.usma.edu/ Navy/Marine Candidate Guidance Office United States Naval Academy 117 Decatur Road Annapolis, Maryland 21402-5018 1-800-638-9156 or (410) – 293-4361 http://www.nadn.navy.mil/ http://www.marines.mil http://www.navy.com Air Force Director of Admissions HQ USFA/R/RRS 2304 Cadet Drive, Suite 2009266 1-800-443 or (719) 333-2520 http://www.usafa.af.mil/ http://www.airforce.com Coast Guard Director of Admissions United States Coast Guard Academy 15 Mohegan Avenue New London, Connecticut 06320-4195 1-800-883-8724 or (860) 444-8500 http://www.cga.edu http://www.uscg.mil.com Merchant Marines Director of Admissions United States Merchant Marine Academy Kins Point, New York 11024-1699 1-800-732-6267 or (866) 546-4778 http://www.usmma.edu

Comparing College Characteristics

Comparing College Characteristics Colleges differ in many ways. Consider the following as you begin to compile your list:  Academic Liberal arts versus business or engineering curriculum Traditional learning philosophy (lecture) versus more hands-on style Core curriculum versus flexible requirements Strength of particular majors Degrees and programs available Semester versus trimester/quarter/or year-round calendar Accessibility of the faculty Honor code Research, foreign study, internship, cooperative-learning opportunities Scholarliness of students Competition for grades among students  Facilities Library quality and accessibility Laboratory/computer/arts/performance facilities Residential life Health services Counseling services Tutorial services Special needs services  Personal Public versus private institution Financial resources and assistance Religious versus secular environment Coeducational or single sex population Campus diversity – ethnic, racial, socioeconomic, geographic, political, religious Campus safety Distance from home Interests, values, appearance of students Quiet or active social life  Questions to consider when evaluating a college What is the size of the student body/campus? Does the campus have supportive climate? Are there adequate academic support services? Are there special mentor programs for students? What financial support programs does the college offer? How much are tuition and fees for a typical year? What kind of student involvement programs exist? What Christian organizations are available? What is the size of a typical freshman class? Does the college provide housing? Cost? What percentage of freshmen continue as sophomores?  Comparison of Colleges Location and setting Type and size of college Comprehensive cost: tuition, room and board, extra fees, books, travel expenses, spending money, special clothing. Financial aid: scholarships, grants, loans, work/study, campus jobs, co-op programs. Admission requirements: required tests grade point average, class rank, residency, special talents. Campus life: cultural events, sports, clubs, recreational facilities, rules. The plans of the diligent lead to profit as surely as haste leads to poverty. Proverbs 21:5 Keep these factors in mind: SAT mid 50% Range: Using the highest verbal and math scores you have achieved on the SAT, check to see where your school choices place you in relation to the middle 50% of SAT scores of their enrolled freshmen. This information can be located by contacting the admissions office and/or literature and brochures from the college. Class Standing: Look at the percentage of enrolled freshmen who came from the top 10% of their high school classes. This statistic reveals the relative weight the college admissions committee places on grades as well as the level of classroom competition among those applying to and attending the college. Please remember the admissions committees take into account that you attend a college preparatory school. College Acceptance Rate: The number of students applying versus the number of acceptances is a good indicator of the competitiveness of the school.

SAT/ACT/PSAT

Bookmarks

SAT & ACT Bookmarks

PSAT Bookmarks

Plain sticky notes

ACT vs SAT

The ACT and SAT are both nationally administered standardized tests, and most colleges or universities will accept either test for admissions purposes. Use this chart to help determine which test might be best for you. ACT: Tests a student’s knowledge of the subjects covered in high school SAT: Measures a student’s reasoning or critical thinking skills See link SAT vs ACT for more details.

PSAT

The PSAT is the Preliminary SAT test given to High School 10th and 11th graders. The NMSQT portion is important for 11th graders. This is the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test for academic recognition and college scholarships. The PSAT is similar to the SAT but is shorter in length and does not contain the essay portion. PSAT FAQ 1. What do the scores mean? Students can add a zero at the end of their score to find out what they would probably make on that section of a SAT test. Remind students that their test scores can and usually do improve from the projected score. A perfect score is an 80 (800 on the SAT) for each subject test. 2. How do I review my test? This is one of the few standardized tests that a student will take and receive the test questions back. They have the opportunity to look at the questions they missed and see why they missed them. At the bottom of the score report it shows the student how many questions they missed of each type (easy, medium, and hard). Remind the students to look to improve the easiest ones first and move up to help improve their scores. 3. What is the selection index? The selection index is the total of the verbal, math, and writing skills tests combined. This index is used to qualify the student for national scholarship competitions. Further information can be found on the bulletin or they can visit www.nationalmerit.org . 4. How is the test scored? Left hand margin of Your Answers section under Scoring. The score report lists how the test was scored. This is a good opportunity to discuss guessing on a test and how to eliminate wrong answers. 5. How can I improve? The students can go through the question and compare to their test bookley to identifies an area or areas that a student missed in that category. Remember a missed answer is scored differently than an omitted question. 6. Most importantly: Students can log into www.collegeboard.com/quickstart . There they will log on or create an account that will provide the following services: • Complete answer explanations on each question. • Personalized study plan for the SAT. • “MyRoad which is a tool used to identify the students possible major, college choices, and career exploration. • Registration for the SAT

Rich sticky notes

Registering for SAT/ACT

Registering for SAT

Students should register for the SAT through their My College Quickstart account. *


Registering for ACT

Register for ACT through www.ACTstudent.org.


*When you register, be sure to take advantage of sending free score reports to the colleges you are interested in attending. 

College Visitation

Plain sticky notes

College and Career Fairs

College and career fairs are often hosted throughout the San Antonio area. These are an optimal time to find out about schools you are interested in attending. Your guidance counselor will let you know the dates for upcoming fair or you can check local high school and community college websites. QUESTIONS TO ASK COLLEGE REPRESENTATIVES: College reps, as well as college students, admissions counselors, and faculty, genuinely enjoy talking to high school students. They like to share their ideas about their college, and they all appreciate students who have thought about the college and want to know more than is in the course catalog, in the view book, or on the Web site. They like thoughtful questions, and their answers can help you make a good college match. Ask questions of interest to you in the following categories: Students ■ How would you characterize the majority of students? ■ From what economic background are the majority of students? ■ Are there clubs, activities, or housing that are minority related? ■ What do students like most about the college? Like least? ■ Has the student government made any real contribution to the school? How do you get into student government? ■ What political, social, or academic issues concerned students last year? How did the administration react? What was the resolution? Social life and campus activities ■ What do students do for fun? ■ What is the role of fraternities and sororities on campus? If I didn’t want to join, could I have a satisfactory social life? ■ What are the dominant social groups on campus? Do the groups get along with one another? Have there been any problems? ■ What role do team sports play in the social life of the college? What happens on football or basketball weekends? If I didn’t want to join in, would I find kindred spirits? ■ Is there a good balance of academics, social life, and extracurricular activities? ■ What were the social or cultural highlights last year? ■ What is the role of the campus newspaper? ■ Is there an alcohol problem and, if so, how is the college handling it? What is the incidence of binge drinking? Do students feel safe on campus? Campus facilities Housing and dining — Is there something I should know about housing that would help me in my choice? — What are the types of food plans? All you can eat? Vegetarian? Kosher? Activity centers and athletic and recreational facilities — What kinds of facilities does the student center have? Is it a magnet for student activities? Are there other hangouts? — Do you think the college pays attention to its appearance? — How would you rate the fitness center? Health, career counseling, special student services, and security — Is there a doctor, nurse, psychologist, or career counselor on campus? What is the waiting period for appointments? — Is the office for special services adequate to the demand? — How good is the security on campus? Library — What have been students’ experiences with the library? Have there been complaints? — Is the library well equipped with computers and copy machines? The community off campus ■ What is there to do in town? How would I get there? Academics and faculty ■ What is distinctive about education here? What is the educational philosophy of the college? Has it changed much in recent years? ■ Is the honor code working? How widespread is cheating? ■ What is the most popular major on campus? Why? ■ Do you think that students are generally enthusiastic about their classes? Do people talk about their courses outside of class? ■ How would you characterize the academic pressure and workload? ■ Are there research possibilities with the faculty? In what areas? ■ What are the strengths and weaknesses of the advising system? ■ What is the quality of student and faculty relationships? Is the faculty interested in and accessible to students after class? Do faculty members participate in student activities? ■ Are curriculum changes in the works? How will that affect my college years? ■ Are any departments being cut back or discontinued? If so, why? ■ Are any new programs scheduled for the next four years? Source: Adapted from Campus Visits & College Interviews by Zola Dincin Schneider (College Board, 2002).This book has many more questions you might ask of college representatives, plus chapters on every aspect of the interview and campus visit.

The Campus Visit

The best way to find out if a college is right for you is to take a visit. Every college has a different atmosphere and feel to it. Before you leave home . . . • Seniors and Juniors at FBA are provided three excused absences to visit colleges. • Many schools have special weekend events and tours. Take advantage of these. • Allow sufficient time for a college visit, preferably a full day and not less than half a day, at each college. • Familiarize yourself with the college catalog or bulletin before you arrive on campus. • Know something about your own high school before visiting. Obtain a copy of the FBA Profile to take with you. It explains our academic college preparatory program, sports, extra-curricular, etc. • Take a copy of your transcript and resume with you. • Give careful attention to your appearance, grooming, and conduct if you are taking a tour or meeting with a counselor. While on campus . . . • Take a guided tour of campus, meet with an admissions counselor, and if time allows, explore for yourself. • Visit classes and talk with students on your own. Ask them questions. • Assess the cleanliness, comfort, noise level, privacy, and safety of the housing. • Evaluate the resources, accessibility of stacks, hours of operation, and helpfulness of staff in the library. • Eat a meal in the dining hall or student union. • Be familiar with campus security and obtain crime statistics. • Pick up a copy of the college newspaper. Read bulletin boards for insight into student interests and upcoming events. • Talk with a professor or two. • Check out Christian organizations available: Campus Crusade, Baptist Student Union, etc. • Check out other areas of interest such as fine arts facilities, the newspaper office, labs (music, science, language), student services and extracurricular options. • Visit the bookstore to see what types of non-required reading material is available. This is an excellent indicator of the academic caliber and general interests of the students. • Take notes. COLLEGE WEEKEND VISITATION OPPORTUNITIES: Texas State University –http://www.admissions.txstate.edu/visit/bobcat-days.html Bobcat Days: October, November, March, April Texas A & M - http://visit.tamu.edu/visits/ Speak to a counselor at the A&M Prospective Student Center 40 NE Loop 410, Suite 605, San Antonio, TX 78216 (210) 212-7016 Steven F. Austin State University - Showcase Saturday http://www.sfasu.edu/admissions/visitsfa/ Schreiner University www.schreiner.edu Schreiner Saturday 1-800-343-4919 Baylor University Premiere Days in April Premiere is an all-day event packed with special offerings. This is an opportunity for prospective students and their parents to come to campus, meet with Baylor faculty, staff and students, and become familiar with life at Baylor. Events are held in the fall, winter and spring for high school and transfer students. A premiere event is a great time to get answers to your questions. http://www.baylor.edu University of Texas Campus Visits for Prospective Freshman www.bealonghorn.utexas.edu/meetus/visit/freshmen Speak to a Counselor at San Antonio Admissions Center 4040 Broadway, Suite 310, San Antonio, TX 78209 (210) 804-2388 University of Texas San Antonio Admissions Center The San Antonio Admissions Center is centrally located four blocks south of San Antonio College on North Main Avenue in the Packard Building. The center is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (with the exception of university holidays). San Antonio Admissions Center The University of Texas at Austin 1123 N. Main Ave.Suite 200, San Antonio, Texas 78212 Phone: 210-562-4665 Texas Tech University – Weekend of Red and Black Oct. http://www.visit.ttu.edu/uday/default.asp San Antonio Admissions Office 4319 Medical Drive, Suite 119, San Antonio, Texas 78229 Phone: 210.614.7576 Fax: 210.614.0450 Email: sanantonio.admissions@ttu.edu

NCAA Eligibility

Bookmarks

Register for NCAA

Plain sticky notes

Why register at NCAA

Student Athletes interested in playing professional sports their freshman year in college will need to register with and meet eligibility requirements for NCAA. This should be done in the sophomore of high school.

Photos

Financial Aid

Bookmarks

FAFSA

Scholarship LInks

Plain sticky notes

Types of FAnancial Aid

You and your family can choose from many different types of financial aid. Some are based on financial need, and some on academic performance. Others are tied to a student's or family's ability to borrow. Not all colleges and universities participate in all programs, but the more you know about financial aid, the better prepared you’ll be. There are four basic types of financial aid available: Scholarships, Grants, Employment, and Loans. 1. SCHOLARSHIPS are private monies that are made available to students from various local community groups, corporate donors, and the University. You do not have to repay scholarships. Each scholarship usually requires a separate application. Exhaust all options: Private sources, public sources, the university, the college of your major.... 2. FEDERAL GRANTS - There are four types of federal student aid grants and one specialized grant/loan combination. All grants are awarded according to financial need, as determined by the federal formula that calculates your expected family contribution (EFC) from the information you submitted on the FAFSA. Students who are eligible for federal student aid have their eligibility for federal grants evaluated after completing the FAFSA. 3. STUDENT EMPLOYMENT - Federal Work-Study is a federally funded program that provides employment opportunities to students with the highest financial need. Placement is limited. 4. FEDERAL LOANS - Loans are funds that you must repay. Students who are eligible for federal student aid have their eligibility for federal loans evaluated after completing the FAFSA. The Federal Loan programs offer a secure, government-regulated and reasonably affordable way to invest in yourself and your goal of a higher education. Even though some loans are based on financial need, there are programs available to all federally eligible students regardless of income. Types of loans include Federal Perkins Loan, Direct Stafford Loans, and PLUS Loans (for Graduate Students or Parents of De pendent Undergraduate Students). www.fafsa.ed.gov OTHER OPTIONS: Private Education Loans, also known as Alternative Loans, are credit-based loans that can help bridge the gap between the actual cost of your education and the amount of your other financial aid funds. Private loans are offered by private lenders and should only be considered after exhausting all other sources of funding – including federal loans. Exemptions are a type of financial assistance allowing some Texas residents to attend a public college or university in Texas without paying tuition or, in some cases, tuition and fees. (Examples include: Adopted Students Formerly in Foster or Other Residential Care, Highest Ranking High School Student, Hazelwood for Texas Veterans…) TEACH Grant - Students who plan to teach may wish to consider the Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant. The TEACH Grant is designed for students who intend to teach full time in a high-need field at a public or private elementary or secondary school that the U.S. Department of Education has designated as having a high concentration of students from low-income families. See www.collegeforalltexans.com for more options.

Colleges with Free Tuition

1. College of the Ozarks, Missouri 2. Berea College, Kentucky 3. Curtis Institute of Music, Pennsylvania 4. Alice Lloyd, Kentucky 5. Webb Institute, New York State 6. Deep Springs College, California 7. U. S. Military Academy, New York 8. U. S. Coast Guard Academy, Connecticut 9. U. S. Naval Academy, Maryland 10. U.S Air Force Academy, Colorado 11. U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, New York 12. Cooper Union College, New York City 13. Williamson E. Macaulay College, New York 14. Barclay College, Kansas 15. Blackburn College, Illinois 16 Ecclesia College, Arizona 17. Sterling College, Vermont 18. Warren Wilson College, North Carolina 19. University of the People online 20. Central Christian College of the Bible, Missouri 21. Haskell Indian Nations University, Kansas 22 Williamson Green School of Mechanical Trades, Pennsylvania 23. Tabor College, Kansas

Avoiding Scholarship Scams

In their search for help with rising tuition costs, students and parents can be easy marks for scholarship scams. By keeping students and families informed and updated, you can help them tell a genuine scholarship opportunity from a scam. Too good to be true? If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Here are some common signs of scams. -Exclusive scholarship info! If a service claims to have "exclusive" information—not available anywhere else—this is almost certainly a fiction. In fact, the vast majority of financial aid comes from the federal government and from universities themselves. Those private foundations and organizations that do offer scholarships are eager to spread the word so they can attract the best candidates—they have no interest in keeping secrets. -No work—free money for college! Another red flag is a claim from any service that it will do "all the work" for applicants. Any legitimate scholarship sponsor will want to hear from the student herself, and that means filling out paperwork, writing a letter or essay, and so on. There is simply no way around it. -Scholarship guaranteed! No service can guarantee students a scholarship. Money-back guarantees are a common feature of scholarship scams—the fine print reveals a list of virtually impossible stipulations in the event the student wants to reclaim her money. Every true scholarship has some parameters—for example, grade point average, professional interest, volunteer service, or club affiliation. So if a service claims it can obtain funds for anyone, it's not being honest. -You've been selected! Unsolicited offers are always suspect and any notification that comes over the phone is almost sure to be a scam. If a student receives information she has not requested, she should investigate before she gives out any personal information or "processing" fees. She can ask how the organization got her name, make follow-up phone calls to check their answer, conduct an online search on the organization, and, of course, come to your office for advice. -Application fees: As a general rule, no one should have to pay more than postage to apply for a scholarship. Legitimate foundations rarely charge applicants, and if they do the fee is minimal. -"Advance-fee" loans: Tell families to be wary of any offer for an unusually low-interest educational loan that requires the student to pay an up-front fee before the loan will be approved or disbursed. Real loans will deduct their processing fees from the student's check when they send it. Families should be especially suspicious if they don't recognize the lender's name—it's worth showing the offer to their local bank officer for a professional opinion. -"Free seminar" or candidate interview: This is often a glorified sales pitch for a financial aid or scholarship consulting service, or a pricey student loan. -Encourage parents and students to ask questions If an organization is aboveboard, then information like a physical address or telephone listing for the company should be available and verifiable. Warn families to particularly beware of P.O. boxes, especially in Florida and California (homes to a disproportionate number of these fraudulent organizations). -Ways to investigate companies Your office should be the first stop for students with questions or doubts about any scholarship offer. They can also contact consumer-protection and government organizations to find out whether a company is under investigation or has been the object of complaints. (Of course, a mere absence of filed complaints or active investigations does NOT necessarily mean that the company is legitimate.) Some of these organizations are: • The Better Business Bureau (BBB) in the city where the scholarship service is located • The Federal Trade Commission, at (877) FTC-HELP or www.ftc.gov/scholarshipscams • Your state department of consumer protection • Your state attorney general's office • The National Fraud Information Center (NFIC), at http://www.fraud.org -Free scholarship searches Scholarship information is freely available to those who take the time and effort to conduct their own search. There is no reason to ever have to pay anyone to help find scholarships. Source: http://professionals.collegeboard.com/guidance/financial-aid/scams

Senior-year calendar for financial aid

September ■ When you write or e-mail colleges that interest you, ask for financial aid info, including what forms to file and their due dates. Put this data on your calendar and to-do list. Note: - All colleges ask you to fill out the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) not just for grants/scholarships, but also for college loans. See November. -Some colleges require the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE®. Click on the Pay for College link at collegeboard.com to complete the application online. You can do so as early as Oct. 1. - Ask if your colleges require their own aid forms, too. ■ If you plan to apply for Early Decision, ask whether your college offers an early estimate of financial aid eligibility and which forms to file. October ■ Research aid opportunities using your library, financial aid guidebooks and Web sites, including Scholarship Search on collegeboard.com. Your counselors may have other resources, too. Look for the following: - federal financial aid sources; - private scholarships; - state and local programs; or -scholarships, including merit and departmental scholarships, offered by colleges to which you’ll apply. Reference materials include books (The College Board Scholarship Handbook) and search engines (e.g., collegeboard.com); both report on national sources of aid. For local and state aid sources (often overlooked!), see your counselor and the public library. ■ Begin work on aid applications. Private scholarship programs may have very early deadlines. ■ Ask a counselor if there will be a family financial aid night at your school or elsewhere in your area this fall. Be sure to attend: The event may be your single best source of information. ■ Use financial aid calculators like those at collegeboard.com to estimate your family’s college costs. November ■ Visit www.pin.ed.gov and get a personal identification number (PIN). You will need a PIN to use as an electronic signature when completing the FAFSA online at www.fafsa.ed.gov (not at www.fafsa.com, which is a Web site that charges at least $79.99 for its services). December ■ You and your family may want to save final pay stubs for the year. On aid forms that you’ll file early in the new year, use the stubs to estimate income. January February ■ Parents and students are encouraged to complete and file income tax returns as soon as possible. Colleges may request copies of your tax returns to finalize aid offers. March ■ As you receive letters of acceptance, check with aid offices to see if additional documentation must be submitted. Some colleges may request copies of your family’s income tax forms, W-2 forms and other materials. April ■ Use the online Compare Your Aid Awards tool at collegeboard.com to help you understand and compare financial aid award offers from two or more colleges. Talk with financial aid officers if you have questions. If you get no aid (or not enough), ask whether other financing plans are available. May ■ If you’ve been offered aid from your chosen college, be sure to accept the offer as instructed in your award letter. (Note: You’ll need to reapply for financial aid every year.) ■ If you’ve received aid from other schools, let them know that you won’t be attending. Source: The College Board Handout 8D College Counseling Sourcebook, 6th Edition. © 2009 The College Board. All rights reserved. Permission granted to copy this for educational purposes.

College Applications

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Plain sticky notes

Applying for College

1. Meet with your college guidance counselor during the spring of your junior year. 2. Research and select five to six schools that you would like to attend. 3. Request or download from each of these colleges its admission application, financial aid, and scholarship information, housing information, and catalog. 4. Review with your parents your school choices and the financial requirements of each. Determine how much you and your family will have for funding. 5. Prepare a resume including extracurricular activities, awards, and employment. 6. Read each set of admissions procedures and requirements, noting the deadlines and recommendation requirements (if any). 7. Make copies of the applications before you begin to complete them. 8. Complete and sign the student portions of the forms (including waivers) for the secondary school report and teacher recommendation sheets before you give those to the counselor and/or teacher. 9. Request transcript from school office – 2 provided free of charge. Subsequent transcripts require a fee of $3.00. 10. Request official scores to be sent to schools from ACT or College Board. 11. Contact the appropriate offices to apply for scholarships and financial aid. 12. Call the college to verify that your file is complete (allow two weeks). 13. File housing applications and fees. Be sure to note deadlines that are independent of admissions deadlines, as is the case with housing at some universities. KEEP COPIES OF EVERTHING YOU SEND TO A COLLEGE!

Helpful Tips

Helpful Tips  Sign the application and include the application fee.  Make your resume as concise as possible.  Include your name and social security number on each piece of your application.  Be neat; have someone proofread the application.  KEEP COPIES OF EVERTHING YOU SEND TO A COLLEGE!  Some schools may fill well before application deadlines (ex: engineering, business).  Remember that university housing sometimes fills by mid October …. even if the application deadline is in November or December.  Early Decision candidates should complete college applications during September and October since most colleges using Early Decision require test scores and applications before November 15.  Usually each college or university has just one Office of Admission to which you submit your admission application. Where to apply for the college’s scholarships and financial aid can be a different story. Check address and contact information out carefully. ESSAYS Some select colleges ask you to write a short essay to describe yourself, a significant experience, or an achievement that has special meaning for you or to discuss some issue of personal, local or national concern, and its importance to you. Keep it simple and straightforward. Try not to deal with difficult ideas such as your philosophy of life or how to solve the world’s problems. Don’t try to con the admissions staff with high-flown statements or obvious flattery. LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATIONS You can’t control what someone will write in a letter of recommendation, however you can influence them. Nearly every scholarship and private university admission application will request a letter of recommendation from your academic guidance counselor or academic teacher. I suggest that you ask several Teachers –Science, Math, Foreign Language Teachers; Coach; community service sponsor, anyone who knows you well. Each will provide a different perspective of your strengths, talents and character traits. The keys to getting an outstanding Letter of Recommendation: • Give teachers and counselors enough time, preferably three weeks, before it is due. Avoid asking during standardized testing and end of semester finals. • Before giving the forms to your teachers, be sure you have filled out all applicable sections. • Provide a Resume • Provide a “Cover Letter” with specific details about yourself and extracurricular activities, where to be sent and to whom letter should be addressed • In your “cover letter” ask that the Letter of Recommendation describe in detail, at least 3-5 of the following characteristics that match the purpose of the scholarship: Your Motivation, Responsibility, Integrity, Honesty, Diligence, Perseverance, Cooperation, Leadership, Judgment, Academic Ability and/or Common Sense. • Offer specific examples as evidence of your achievements. • Provide an envelope for a confidential letter and again be specific – You will pick up or mailed? Return to High School Counselor’s Office? • Remind your teacher/sponsor to use school/organization letterhead. PERSONAL INTERVIEWS A few colleges require the on or off campus interview, which provides an opportunity for the college and the applicant to get to know each other better. Here are some suggestions for the admission interview: 1. Be on time for the appointment. 2. Be knowledgeable about the college; you should have read admissions materials and the catalogue before the interview. 3. Have a list of questions which are not answered in the admissions literature. A paper and pencil for notes may be helpful. 4. Meet your interviewer with a firm handshake and maintain eye contact as you talk and listen. 5. Don’t expect trick questions, but be prepared to talk about yourself and your academic record, extracurricular activities, accomplishments, career interests and interest in that particular college. 6. Don’t be unduly nervous; remember that the colleges are just as interested in selling itself to you as you are in selling yourself to the college. 7. Note your interviewer’s name so you can later send a letter of thanks for his/her time. ORDERING A TRANSCRIPT When a student applies to a university, he or she must also send an official transcript. This transcript must be sent directly from FBA to the university. Your transcript is a record of all courses taken in high school, high school GPA & numeric average will also appear on the transcript. Scholarship applications often request a transcript as well. Transcripts may be ordered by completing a transcript request form supplied by the school office. The FBA Counseling office must have a minimum of 3 days’ notice before sending a transcript. Transcripts cannot be faxed or mailed via overnight services. Official copies of transcripts cannot be given to students or to parents to be delivered to another school or individual. Plan ahead so that your transcripts will arrive by the published deadline. Partial transcripts will be sent during the school year. Final transcripts will be available the Monday after graduation and will be sent to the school of your request. If Dual Credit classes were taken, a transcript from St. Phillips Community College will also need to be requested and sent from your ACES account. The Guidance Counselor will take your final FBA transcript to the Records Department at St. Phillips College on the Monday after graduation for your college transcript to be release. Please wait until the end of that week to request your transcript from St. Phillips.

Time Lines

TIME LINE FOR THE COLLEGE PROCESS FRESHMAN YEAR September - July:  Work diligently in all classes and check Praxi frequently to monitor grades. Every grade in high school affects your graduating GPA (Grade Point Average).  Know the requirements for graduation and keep in mind your graduation goals. (Example: distinguished or recommended graduate, top 10 %,…)  Carefully consider involvement in extra-curricular, volunteer, community service, employment and ministry efforts that can be used for building a strong resume’. The activities should demonstrate characteristics of: 1. Well-rounded involvement (academics, arts, athletics…) 2. Leadership skills (NHS, House council, band officer…) 3. Team work (group work, band, choir, athletics…) 4. Special interests (extra-curricular, arts, athletics, clubs, TAPPS, foreign language, travel…) 5. Servitude (sound crew, mission trips, VBS…)  Keep a detailed record of all involvements and achievements throughout the next four years. Include the names of key individuals whom you may contact for recommendations and letters of reference.  Review Terra Nova testing results for patterns of strengths and weakness.  Be an involved school and community member while making time to read! SOPHOMORE YEAR September - October:  Review all items on the Freshman Year Time Line.  Take a solid and appropriate course load. Plan activities that demonstrate maturity, initiative and purpose. Check Praxi frequently, monitor grades.  Be an involved school and community member!  Take PSAT and PLAN test November- May:  Review PSAT and PLAN Score Report for patterns of strengths and weakness; meet with guidance counselor or teacher if you have questions.  Consider taking Dual Credit and concurrent enrollment classes during Junior/Senior year. The guidance counselor will walk you through the process of registering for Dual Credit and taking the TSI Assessment (formerly THEA or ACCUPLACER.  Take the TSI Assessment to gain eligibility for taking Dual Credit Classes.  Do a good job on your final exams.  Review Terra Nova testing results for patterns of strengths and weakness. June - July:  Update detailed record of all involvements and achievements. Include the names of key individuals whom you may contact for recommendations and letters of reference.  Continue to retake necessary portions of the TSI Assessment until minimum scores are reached for Dual Credit eligibility.  Research resources available for SAT and ACT test preparation materials/courses.  Work, pursue a passion, be involved in community service, and read. JUNIOR YEAR September - October:  Review all items on the Freshman Year Time Line.  Take a solid and appropriate course load. Plan activities that demonstrate maturity, initiative and purpose. Check Praxi frequently to monitor grades.  Be an involved school and community member!  Take PSAT test November- February:  Review PSAT Score Report; meet with guidance counselor or teacher if you have questions  Plan campus exploratory visits  Attend College Fairs offered in community.  Register for spring or summer SAT and ACT  Work regularly on SAT and ACT practice materials. March - May:  Narrow list of colleges you plan to visit to a manageable number  Schedule parent/student meeting with college guidance counselor  Discuss senior course selection with your college counselor  Consider taking online college courses that may be tuition free  Visit colleges  Make productive summer plans (enrichment, employment, internship, community service, volunteer). Apply for summer enrichment opportunities  Take college entrance exams (SAT and/or ACT) June - July:  Update detailed record of all involvements and achievements. Include the names of key individuals whom you may contact for recommendations and letters of reference.  Visit the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse website if you plan to participate in Division I or II sports. You must have a form on file to be considered for athletic scholarships or play Division I or II sports.  Visit colleges, review entrance requirements, and take note of all deadlines  Research scholarships awarded by companies and individual schools  Engage in productive activities such as study abroad, work, community service, college summer programs and READ! SENIOR YEAR August - October:  Attend all Senior Advisory sessions and come prepared to ask questions  Take as many challenging courses as is reasonable; strive to make the best grades possible;  Combat “senioritis” by keeping your graduation plan in mind and remembering that senior performance does effect GPA  Complete campus visits during September and October  Keep track of all due dates and deadlines  Register for the SAT or ACT four weeks in advance  Apply for scholarships (institution and corporation)  Submit early decision or early action applications by October 15  Request transcripts from registrar and St. Phillip’s if you took Dual Credit November – February  Work on regular decision applications  Spend adequate time preparing essays and personal statements  Request faculty recommendations at least one month in advance  Complete applications by December 1 for January 1-15 deadlines  Withdraw all other applications previously filed if you applied for early decision and you receive notification of admission  Plan college finances and complete financial aid forms (FAFSA, CSS Profile)  Forward mid-year reports to the registrar, if applicable  Continue to research scholarship opportunities March - May:  Decide which college you will attend and return necessary forms and deposits  Report all acceptances to your guidance counselor so that final transcripts can be sent  Enjoy your senior trip and Graduation Day

Alumni

Plain sticky notes

Request transcript

To request a transcript, you may call or email the guidance counselor at (210) 658-5331 tsanroman@fbauc.com. Please include the following: -Your name at the time of graduation. -Your graduating year. -The name and address of the place/person to send the transcript to. -Your contact phone number or email so I can send verification to that it was sent.

We would love to hear from you!!

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU!! PLEASE DROP US A LINE AT E-mail: administrator@fbauc.com OR CALL US AT (210) 658-5331

Photos

9th Grade

Rich sticky notes

Freshman Timeline

September - July:

 

*    Work diligently in all classes and check Praxis frequently to monitor grades.  Every grade in high school and 8th grade Algebra I affects your graduating GPA (Grade Point Average).

 

*    Know the requirements for graduation and keep in mind your graduation goals. (Example: endorsements, distinguished graduate, performance acknowledgements, top 10 %,…)

 

*    Carefully consider involvement in extra-curricular, volunteer, community service, employment and ministry efforts that can be used for building a strong resume’.  The activities should demonstrate characteristics of:

1.    Well-rounded involvement (academics, arts, athletics…)

2.    Leadership skills (NHS, House council, band officer…)

3.    Team work (group work, band, choir, athletics…)

4.    Special interests (extra-curricular, arts, athletics, clubs, TAPPS, foreign language, travel…)

5.    Servitude (sound crew, mission trips, VBS…)

 

*    Keep a detailed record of all involvements and achievements throughout the next four years.  Include the names of key individuals whom you may contact for recommendations and letters of reference.

 

*    Review Terra Nova testing results for patterns of strengths and weakness.

 

*    Be an involved school and community member while making time to read!

 

 

 

 

 

10th Grade

Rich sticky notes

Sophomore Timeline

September - October:

 

*    Review all items on the Freshman Year Time Line.

 

*    Take a solid and appropriate course load.  Plan activities that demonstrate maturity, initiative and purpose.  Check Praxis frequently to monitor grades.


*  Register for NCAA eligibility if you want to play Division level sports in college.

 

*    Be an involved school and community member!

 

*    Take PSAT test

 

November- May:

 

*    Review PSAT  Score Report for patterns of strengths and weakness; meet with guidance counselor or teacher if you have questions.

 

*    Consider taking Dual Credit enrollment classes during Junior/Senior year.  The guidance counselor will walk you through the process of registering for Dual Credit and taking the TSI Assessment (formerly THEA or ACCUPLACER).

 

*    Take the TSI Assessment to gain eligibility for taking Dual Credit Classes. 

 

*    Do a good job on your final exams.

 

*    Review Terra Nova testing results for patterns of strengths and weakness.

 

 

June - July:

 

*    Update detailed record of all involvements and achievements. Include the names of key individuals whom you may contact for recommendations and letters of reference.

 

*    Continue to retake necessary portions of the TSI Assessment until minimum scores are reached for Dual Credit eligibility.

 

*    Research resources available for SAT and ACT test preparation materials/courses.

 

*    Work, pursue a passion, be involved in community service, and read. 

11th Grade

Rich sticky notes

Junior Time line

September - October:

 

*    Review all items on the Freshman and Sophomore Year Time Line.

 

*    Take a solid and appropriate course load.  Plan activities that demonstrate maturity, initiative and purpose.  Check Praxis frequently to monitor grades.

 

*    Be an involved school and community member!

 

*    Take PSAT/NMSQT test

 

 

November- February:

 

*    Review PSAT Score Report; meet with guidance counselor or teacher if you have questions

 

*    Plan campus exploratory visits

 

*    Attend College Fairs offered in community.

 

*    Register for spring or summer SAT  and ACT

 

*    Work regularly on SAT and ACT practice materials.

 

 

March - May:

      

*    Narrow list of colleges you plan to visit to a manageable number

 

*    Schedule parent/student meeting with college guidance counselor

 

*    Discuss senior course selection with your college counselor

 

*    Consider taking online college courses that may be tuition free

 

*    Visit colleges

 

*    Make productive summer plans (enrichment, employment, internship, community service, volunteer). Apply for summer enrichment opportunities

 

*    Take college entrance exams (SAT and/or  ACT)

 

June - July:

 

*    Update detailed record of all involvements and achievements. Include the names of key individuals whom you may contact for recommendations and letters of reference.

 

*    Visit the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse website if you plan to participate in Division I or II sports.  You must have a form on file to be considered for athletic scholarships or play Division I or II sports.

 

*    Visit colleges, review entrance requirements, and take note of all deadlines


*    Research scholarships awarded by companies and individual schools

 

*    Engage in productive activities such as study abroad, work, community service, college summer programs and READ!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12th Grade

Plain sticky notes

Senior Year timeline

Senior Year August - October: Attend all Senior Advisory sessions and come prepared to ask questions Take as many challenging courses as is reasonable; strive to make the best grades possible; Combat “senioritis” by keeping your graduation plan in mind and remembering that senior performance does effect GPA Complete campus visits during September and October Keep track of all due dates and deadlines Register for the SAT or ACT four weeks in advance Apply for scholarships (institution and corporation) Submit early decision or early action applications by October 15 Request transcripts from registrar and St. Phillip’s if you took Dual Credit November – February Work on regular decision applications Spend adequate time preparing essays and personal statements Request faculty recommendations at least one month in advance Complete applications by December 1 for January 1-15 deadlines Withdraw all other applications previously filed if you applied for early decision and you receive notification of admission Plan college finances and complete financial aid forms (FAFSA, CSS Profile) Forward mid-year reports to the registrar, if applicable Continue to research scholarship opportunities March - May: Decide which college you will attend and return necessary forms and deposits Report all acceptances to your guidance counselor so that final transcripts can be sent Enjoy your senior trip and Graduation Day

Elementary/Middle School Resources

Bookmarks

Bookmarks